September Wrap-Up

Last month seems to have been something of a reading rollercoaster; the highs were high, and the lows were rock bottom… 😓 On the whole, though, I’d say the good outweighed the bad. Here are the five novels I managed to read in September:

The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty by Anne Rice. An erotic retelling of Sleeping Beauty that had so many problems beyond just not being my thing… I’ve written a full review of this book – voicing all my confusion and frustration over it – which you can find here, if you so desire. But in short: the characters were bland, the plot was non-existant, the world-building (which my brain got really stuck on for some reason) was abysmal, and the sex scenes were boring and repetitive… 😑 Would not recommend. To anyone.Now I Rise by Kiersten White. The sequel to Now I Darken, which follows a Lada who has now left the Ottoman court to reclaim her throne, and her brother Radu, who has stayed behind in a seemingly hopeless attempt to win Mehmed’s love. Ah, I love this series so much! 💕 And everything seems to be escalating beautifully; it’s such an exciting novel! Obviously I can’t say much about what actually happens, but I will say that both Lada and Radu remain excellent protagonists, and it’s very interesting contrasting the way each of them thinks of Mehmed (about whom my own feelings are becoming correspondingly complicated).When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon. A somewhat lacklustre romance between two Indian-American teenagers, one of whom feels that her family’s traditions are holding her back, while the other feels very connected to those same traditions. Also there was an app development convention, but it wasn’t as important to the story as it might have been… The book had both cute parts and interesting parts, but was mainly rather meh. 😕 You can find my review here.Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne. My September Library Scavenger Hunt pick; a classic adventure/exploration novel, wherein an eccentric geologist and his nephew embark on a trip to the centre of the Earth. This book was silly, but a whole lot of fun, and I ended up enjoying it a lot more than I thought I would. Once again, I’ve got a review for this already posted.Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie. The second book in the Imperial Radch series, which follows the soldier Breq, who was once part of an enormous starship, but is now learning to live with one body instead of hundreds… There’s not much that I can say that will do this series (so far!) justice, but I didn’t enjoy this one quite as much as I did Ancillary Justice… I did like the interactions between Breq and her new crew, and I also found the story very interesting, but I was surprised by how little it seemed to be connected to the events of the first book – and even now, I’m not entirely sure why Breq was sent to Athoek Station (I understand why she wanted to go there, but it wasn’t so clear why she was ordered to go there). Also, I would’ve liked to see more of Seivarden, who was absent for a lot of this book… That said, I still liked it a lot, and, to be honest, Ancillary Justice must have been an incredibly hard book to follow up. Hopefully I’ll have a more detailed review up soon. 😊

Review: When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon (Spoiler-Free)

Dimple Shah has one dream, and one dream only: To create an app that can make a difference in people’s lives, while still being fun. The elite Insomnia Con could go a long way towards making that dream a reality, but she’ll need her parents’ permission (and funding) if she wants to attend the expensive app development course, and their plans for Dimple’s future are very different; a husband and family, as soon as possible.

Rishi Patel is hoping to attend Insomnia Con, too, but not because he has any particular interest in coding… He’s there just for Dimple, the girl his parents (and hers) have arranged for him to marry.

This book has been hyped to the skies recently, and I’ll admit that I may have fallen victim to that to an extent, but my main problem with When Dimple Met Rishi was not that it wasn’t what I expected, but just that it’s not very good. 😑 The advertising for the book is certainly misleading in regards to how important Dimple’s app (which, by the way, sounds very much like a narrower, less customisable version of Habitica) would be to the story, but as I was anticipating this (the first time I even heard about this aspect of the story was in a list of books that lied about themselves), it didn’t bother me too much.

What did bother me was how much of the book was taken up with the talent show sub-plot, which could easily have been cut without any consequences whatsoever – except that the book would only have been about half the length. To be honest, it was strange that this talent show was taking place at all at a convention that was supposed to be so labour-intensive that it’d been called “Insomnia Con”… It is explained after the show is over that the prize money is supposed to go towards the winning team’s app, but it doesn’t seem to me to justify the amount of coding time that’s sacrificed in order to prepare for the show. A question for people who know more about app development that I do: Is the money that goes into an app more important than the time? If yes, then I guess this is a non-issue, but otherwise… (Also, if yes, then Menon really should have tried to find a way to make that clear.)

And the characters were also pretty frustrating. Both Dimple and Rishi started out reasonably likably, but their characters went rapidly downhill once Insomnia Con started. They were really judgmental (Rishi less so than Dimple, but not enough to save him from also being incredibly irritating) about everyone around them, and in particular a group that they referred to as the Aberzombies – a trio of wealthy, elitist teenagers who were the most clichéd and one-dimensional villains Menon could possibly have added to the story. Celia and Ashish were the only other major characters at Insomnia Con, and they also only seemed to be there for the benefit of Dimple and Rishi: Celia’s presence meant that Dimple would always have amazing clothes on hand, without Menon having to portray her as the kind of girl who takes her whole wardrobe on holiday with her (which kind of feels like judgement from the author, as well as the characters; liking clothes doesn’t automatically make a person shallow), while Ashish popped up in order to teach Dimple and Rishi how to dance… And also to provide a contrast to Rishi. But since that contrast had already been provided in Dimple, there was really very little point to his being there.

I did find Dimple and Rishi’s different perspectives on Indian culture very interesting, so that’s something that this book has going for it, and I also thought that the relationship between Dimple and her father was very sweet… Menon seemed to be going for a mixture of cute and quirky that makes so many contemporary romances so fun to read, but ended up with something that was mostly just shallow. On the whole, When Dimple Met Rishi ended up falling rather flat for me.