Winter Wrap-Up

Guys. Guys. I read so many good books in the last couple of months! 😱 I know there aren’t many five-stars here, but pretty much everything I’ve read recently has come super-close, so don’t be surprised if I end up changing these ratings later (especially for some of the Vorkosigan Saga books, which I’ve been loving). I am in the opposite of a reading slump. A reverse reading slump? A reading boom? Who knows. But in any case, I’m on a roll! 💕 Here are all the amazing books:

LIBRARY SCAVENGER HUNT PICKS

JANUARY
[REVIEW]

FEBRUARY
[REVIEW]

 

OTHER BOOKS I REVIEWED

[REVIEW]

[REVIEW]

[REVIEW]

[REVIEW]

BOOKS I DIDN’T REVIEW

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. [AUDIOBOOK; Narrators: Jay Snyder, Brandon Rubin, Fred Berman, Lauren Fortgang, Roger Clark, Elizabeth Evans & Tristan Morris]

The first book in the Six of Crows duology, which takes place in the Grisha-verse, and follows a motley crew of thieves as they try to pull off a seemingly-impossible heist; snatching a heavily-guarded Shu scientist from inside the supposedly impenetrable Ice Court. A re-read (or re-listen, I guess), and every inch as amazing the second time around as it was the first. This is definitely still my favourite Grisha-verse story (though I have high hopes for King of Scars). A note on the narration, since that’s the only part of the book that was new to me: I found some of the voices a little startling at first (especially Matthias, who absolutely does not sound like a teenager), but all the voice actors did an amazing job (though Inej’s – Lauren Fortgang – was probably my favourite).

Tehanu by Ursula Le Guin. [Illustrator: Charles Vess]

The fourth book in the Earthsea Cycle, which follows a now middle aged and widowed Tenar, who finds herself caring for a young, brutalised girl called Therru, as well as a frail and lost Ged, newly returned from the land of the dead. A really interesting read! I didn’t like it quite as much as I have some of the other Earthsea books, but I really enjoyed getting to know this new version of Tenar, and seeing where life had taken her – which wasn’t where I was expecting at all. Her relationship with Therru was also really touching (as was the relationship with Ged, though it was less of a focus), and the novel’s discourse on the power of women was very thought-provoking.

Uprooted by Naomi Novik.

The tale of a girl called Agnieszka, who is chosen to become the servant of the ominous, aloof Dragon who rules her village, a sacrifice that her people must make to him every ten years, if he is to continue keep the malevolent Wood at bay. I absolutely loved this book! My favourite parts were the relationship that grew between Agnieszka and the Dragon, which was simultaneously adorable and hilarious, and the creepy atmosphere of evil-just-off-stage that the Wood provided for much of the story. The only part of the book that I had any complaints with was the brief Capital-arc, which I felt was a little rushed and over-convenient in terms of plot development, but even there I found plenty to entertain me. In short: Not a perfect book, but so, so charming. 💕

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll. [COMIC]

A collection of spooky stories that I was inspired to re-read after finishing Uprooted, for a little more of that dark-fairytale atmosphere – though this book plays into that a lot more than Uprooted did. Beautifully illustrated, and incredibly chilling.

The Warrior’s Apprentice by Lois McMaster Bujold.

The second book in the Vorkosigan Saga, but fourth chronologically (the chronology of this series is confusing, but here is the author’s suggested reading order, which I will roughly be following). After failing the entrance exams for the Barrayaran Imperial Service Academy, Miles Vorkosigan heads off to visit his grandmother on Beta Colony, but his holiday doesn’t go quite as planned, as he soon finds himself accidentally in command of a mercenary fleet, and embroiled in an inter-planetary war. I am absolutely loving this series, and The Warrior’s Apprentice started it off for me with a bang! Miles is an excellent protagonist, and all the aspects of the plot (action-driven and character-driven) were incredibly gripping. Also, Bujold is a really great writer. I can’t wait to read the rest of this series (and maybe even jump into her fantasy novels, too!).

The Mountains of Mourning by Lois McMaster Bujold. [SHORT STORY]

A short story set between The Warrior’s Apprentice and The Vor Game, in which Miles is sent by his father to investigate the death of a child in a remote village on their family’s lands. Plot-wise, I wasn’t hugely surprised by the eventual reveal of what happened to the child, though the details of it were rather chilling. The real strength of this story was in its characters and world-building, however; the similarities between the dead child and Miles himself, both considered less than human by most of Barrayar due to their birth defects; the reaction of the villagers to Miles’ presence, particularly in a position of authority… I’m not often a big fan of short stories, or of crime novels, but I’m pleased that this one bucked the trend. A definite highlight of the series so far.

The Vor Game by Lois McMaster Bujold.

The sixth-published and fifth chronological novel in the Vorkosigan Saga, in which Miles gets his first military posting as Lazkowski Base’s new weather officer, which is absolutely not the one he was hoping for, or what he’s been trained for. After, he finds himself unexpectedly reunited with the Dendarii Mercenaries – now dealing with in-fighting – and charged with the safety of Emperor Gregor Vorbarra, who has somehow managed to escape his ImpSec entourage, and has no easy way home. This was an odd story, and seemed like it ought really to have been two, as the tone of the novel shifted drastically halfway through, when Miles left Lazkowski Base. The first half (previously published on its own as the novella Weatherman) – where Miles was dealing with a dangerous commanding officer, and enlisted soldiers who refused to take him seriously due to his physical disabilities – was probably my favourite thing that I’ve read from this series so far, but I also enjoyed the later part, which was more action-driven, and which gave a proper introduction to Gregor (who I loved).

The Travelling Cat Chronicles by Hiro Arikawa.

Told from the perspective of a former-stray cat Nana, this short novel takes us on a trip across Japan, as Satoru tries to find a new home for his beloved cat. Along the way, we’re introduced to several of Satoru’s old friends, whose lives are improved by Nana in various subtle ways, before Nana makes it clear that he’s not yet ready to leave Satoru behind – until we finally come to understand the reason why Satoru and Nana have to be parted. I’m not sure what I was expecting from this book, but I was really surprised by how much I liked it. Nana made for an entertaining narrator, the bond between him and Satoru felt almost tangible, and I really liked learning about Satoru’s history with each of the people they visited. It was also incredibly sad in places, but beautifully written.

Fire Falling by Elise Kova.

The second book in the Air Awakens series, in which Vhalla – now property of the Empire – slowly makes her way north to war, struggling with her powers, her conscience, and her feelings for the Crown Prince. I didn’t like this book quite as much as Air Awakens, as its plot felt a little filler-y, but I really enjoyed the relationship development between Vhalla and Aldrik, and as usual, Kova’s writing was incredibly absorbing. A new character called Elecia was also introduced in this book, and even though I didn’t like her that much here, I’m hoping that we’ll get to know her a little better in the next few books, as, to be honest, there aren’t very many memorable female characters in this series (barring Vhalla herself, of course). In any case, I’m looking forward to (finishing) Earth’s End.

The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden. [AUDIOBOOK; Narrator: Kathleen Gati]

The third and final book in the Winternight trilogy, which begun in The Bear and the Nightingale. With the Bear loosed on the world, and Russia on the brink of war, Vasya must find a way to unite humans and chyerti before both are destroyed. This was such a great series, and such a great ending! 💕 I loved Vasya, I loved all the supporting characters (human and chyerti), I loved the romance, and the story was amazing. My favourite part of the book was Vasya’s journey through Midnight, where I could have happily stayed forever, if it wouldn’t have meant missing out on the rest of the novel. 😅 Definitely my favourite book in the series.

Tales from Earthsea by Ursula Le Guin. [Illustrator: Charles Vess]

The fifth book in the Earthsea Cycle, which is a collection of short stories following various different people at various points in Earthsea’s timeline. The Finder is the story of the founding of the school of magic on Roke Island; Darkrose and Diamond is a love story; The Bones of the Earth tells the tale of Ogion’s former teacher; On the High Marsh follows a woman who meets and takes in a mysterious wandering wizard; and Dragonfly is about a magically-gifted young woman, who wishes to enter the school on Roke. As I said earlier, I’m not usually a fan of short stories, but like Bujold, Ursula Le Guin is somehow able to write ones that I really love. 💕 My favourites from this collection were The Finder and On the High Marsh, but they’re all beautiful and thought-provoking, and do a great job of fleshing out the world of Earthsea. Also, for anyone who’s interested in the music of Earthsea, this lovely piece is an arrangement of the song at the end of Darkrose and Diamond.

Cetaganda by Lois McMaster Bujold.

The ninth-published book in the Vorkosigan Saga and sixth chronologically, in which Miles and his cousin Ivan are sent on a mission to the home planet of Barrayar’s former enemies, the Cetagandans, in order to represent Barrayar at the funeral of the dowager Empress, and find themselves implicated in the theft of a piece of the Empress’ regalia. Another great entry in the series! The storyline was really interesting, as was the Cetagandan society that we were introduced to here, and I also really loved the relationship dynamics between Miles and Ivan, and Miles and Rian (this book’s most prominent new character).

Ethan of Athos by Lois McMaster Bujold.

The third Vorkosigan Saga book in publication order, and seventh chronologically, in which a new protagonist, Ethan, is forced to leave his all-male, gynophobic home planet of Athos in order to seek out new uterine samples before his people become unable to reproduce, only to find himself immediately in trouble with a group of deadly Cetagandans, and under the dubious protection of Elli Quinn. Miles is not in this book (it seems to take place at around the same time as Cetaganda), and I missed him, but it was nice to have the opportunity to get to know Elli a little better, and Ethan’s reactions to the universe beyond Athos were hilarious. In terms of world-building, I found Athos really interesting, and plot-wise the book was cohesive, and pretty action-packed; Ethan seems to have Miles’ knack for trouble, if not for escaping it. 😅

Labyrinth by Lois McMaster Bujold. [SHORT STORY]

A short story set after Cetaganda, in which Miles finds himself in the lawless Jackson’s Whole – nominally to purchase weapons for the Dendarii Mercenaries, but actually to collect a scientist for the Barrayaran government – only for his plans to go very drastically awry. Probably my least favourite Vorkosigan story so far (not that that’s saying much), but still a fun adventure. I enjoyed the interaction between Miles and Bel, as well as my first encounter with quaddies (who I remember hearing will play an important part in some of the other novels)… But Taura was the real highlight of this story, so I’m pleased that it seems like she’ll be sticking around.

[EDIT (25/3/2019): Added link to Lies We Tell Ourselves review.]

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Review: Alex, Approximately by Jenn Bennett (Spoiler-Free)

Bailey wants nothing to do with her mother and stepfather’s messy divorce, so she’s moving to California to live with her dad. But she has another reason to be excited about her new home town: It’s also the home town of the mysterious Alex, a boy she met online, who may or may not be the boy of her dreams.

To be honest, I didn’t have very high expectations for this book. I bought it primarily because I liked Night Owls (Jenn Bennett’s previous YA novel) so much, but the premise of two old-movie buffs falling in love wasn’t something that particularly excited me… and it turned out to be adorable! 💕

There’s something incredibly addictive about Bennett’s writing style, and I found myself flying through this book, completely immersed; I read nearly the whole thing in one sitting, which isn’t common for me. I was also pleasantly surprised by the lack of film references in the book. There were some scattered about the story, but not an obnoxious amount, and so one of my greatest worries about this book – that it would be full of annoying references to films I didn’t know or care about – was proved needless.

Instead, the book’s main focus was on Bailey – who, as an avoider, was one of the most personally relatable characters I’ve ever come across – and her developing relationships with the people she meets in California, of which there weren’t a huge number, but quality is definitely preferable to quantity in my opinion, and that quality was delivered in spades. I really liked her friendship with her new co-worker Grace, and the dynamic she had with Porter – the third member of this book’s kind-of-love triangle – was really cute, and frequently hilarious. And although there weren’t too many of them, her IM conversations with Alex provided some nice dramatic irony, as well as a slightly different perspective on the book’s events.

And on the topic of Alex: his true identity was very clear, very early on, despite a (short-lived) red herring being thrown into the mix. In the book’s defence, however, that particular plot twist was much more obvious because of romance tropes than because of anything that Bailey was able to find out from her sleuthing – so although I was occasionally a little frustrated about how long it was taking her to figure it out, the feeling usually passed quickly.

The Mean Girls Book Tag

Hello, all! 😀 Today I thought I’d try the Mean Girls book tag, which I’ve seen in quite a few places (though not recently), but, as usual, wasn’t tagged for – it’s just such a great film, and with so many great, quotable moments! This tag barely even scratches the surface, despite its length. Speaking of which, I have quite a lot of questions to answer, so I’ll try to keep my answers short. 😛 The Mean Girls book tag was created by Sarah Jane at TheBookLife.

J.K. Rowling//Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire1) “It’s pronounced like Cady.” – Which fictional character’s name did you get completely wrong?

For this one, I’m going to have to admit that I was one of the legions of people who thought for the longest time that Hermione was pronounced “Hermy-own”… But at least our mistake led to J.K. Rowling writing in that brilliant scene between Hermione and Krum in Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire.

Dragon Age: Inquisition2) “She doesn’t even go here!” – Which character would you like to place in a fictional world from another book or series?

Disregarding the “book” part of this question (or at least half of it), I’d really love to dump Hermione in the Dragon Age universe, and watch her rage against the Circle system, and the subjugation of the elves. I’ve actually just started an Inquisitor!Hermione playthrough of Dragon Age: Inquisition, and it’s been a lot of fun so far!

Jennifer L. Armentrout//Obsidian3) “On Wednesdays we wear pink!” – Repetition. Repetition. Which book gave you deja-vu of another book whilst reading it?

Definitely Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout, which was ridiculously like Twilight, but a million times more self-aware. And also with aliens. Clearly there was some very heavy “inspiration”, but luckily the two series go in completely different directions, or else it probably would’ve started to annoy me after a while (even though I think the Lux books are much better than the Twilight books…).

Kate Cann//Fiesta4) “You all have got to stop calling each other sluts and whores. It just makes it okay for guys to call you sluts and whores.” – Which book gave you the complete opposite of girl power feels?

Maybe Fiesta by Kate Cann? I had a lot of problems with this book that went beyond a severe lack of girl power (& which I talked about in my review), but one of the major ones was the way the main characters – who were supposed to be best friends – always seemed to be turning on each other over boys… :/

Peter V. Brett//The Skull Throne5) “You go, Glen Coco!” – Name a character you felt like you wanted to cheer on whilst reading.

I’m currently in the middle of The Skull Throne by Peter V. Brett, and there are a lot of characters that I’m rooting for, but none (for now) so much as Sikvah, who just had her most epic moment yet! 😀

6) “Get in loser, we’re going shopping!” – How long do you typically spend at a book shop?

Bookshops are magical places where I completely lose track of time, so I’m not usually able to tell how long I’ve spent in one… except that it’s always longer than it should be. I try to avoid even setting foot in a bookshop unless I know I have several hours to burn. 😳

7) “It’s not my fault you’re, like, in love with me or something!” – Which character would have to get out a restraining order on you, if they were real?

… I actually don’t know. :/ I love a lot of characters in a lot of books, but none so much that I’d actually go all creepy-stalker on them…

Sarah J. Maas//Throne of Glass8) “I can’t help it that I’m popular.” – Which over-hyped book were you cautious about reading?

I was very hot-and-cold about whether I wanted to read the Throne of Glass books by Sarah J. Maas, after hearing all the hype… I’m definitely glad I did pick them up, though! 😀

J.K. Rowling//Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix9) “She’s a life-ruiner. She ruins peoples lives.” – We all love Regina George. Name a villain you just love to hate.

Ugh, Umbridge from Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix. She’s fantastically-written, but so awful and petty! 😡

Patrick Ness//The Knife of Never Letting Go10) “I’m not like a regular Mom; I’m a cool Mom.” – Your favourite fictional parents.

He’s not actually Todd’s father, but Ben from the Chaos Walking trilogy is such a brilliant father-figure; I love their whole relationship. ❤

Tamora Pierce//The Magic in the Weaving11) “That is so Fetch!” – Which book or series would you love to catch on?

The Emelan-universe books by Tamora Pierce (i.e. the Circle of MagicThe Circle OpensThe Circle Reforged series)! I love these books so much, and they’re reasonably well-known and well-regarded (though not so much so as her Tortall books), but I never hear anyone talking about them! 😦

12) “How do I even begin to explain Regina George?” – Describe your ideal character to read about.

Clever and creative, but without the need to shove it in people’s faces. Understated, I guess. And with a wonderful circle of friends (my love of a character is often based more on how they interact with the people around them than on that character as an individual).

13) “I just have a lot of feelings.” – What do you do when a book gives you a bad case of the feels?

I either call or message my friends and rant about it, if they’ve read it too, or else I badger them incessantly to do so. Immediately.

Jenn Bennett//Night Owls14) “Nice wig Janice, what’s it made of?” “Your Mom’s chest hair!” – Which character’s one-liners would you love to claim for your own?

You know, I can’t actually think of any books I’ve read with particularly witty one-liners? I would like to steal Beatrix’s internal monologue, though (from Night Owls by Jenn Bennett), and this quote in particular:

This was the night bus, not a Journey song. Two strangers were not on a midnight train going anywhere. I was going home, and he was probably going to knock over a liquor store.”

Morgan Rhodes//Falling Kingdoms15) “Boo, you whore.” – Name a time a character’s decision has made you roll your eyes.

Jonas from the Falling Kingdoms series has the worst ideas of all time, ever. I’m really enjoying the books, but as the series has gone on, I’ve found it increasingly difficult to suspend my disbelief that anyone could consider him a serious threat.

T5W: Books that deal with tough topics

Time for another Top 5 Wednesday! I haven’t done one of these since November, which is shockingly long ago, and I seem to have missed some really interesting themes! Speaking of which: Today’s theme is books with “hard” topics, such as mental health, illness, sexual assault, etc. And since I’m a sucker for a good tear-jerker (as books that touch on these topics often are), I’ve managed to find quite a few on my bookshelves. 😉 As always, it was difficult narrowing it down to just five, but here are some of my favourites:

Katie McGarry//Crash Into You5) Crash Into You by Katie McGarry

The Pushing the Limits series is full of characters with difficult backgrounds (orphans, runaways, drug dealers, etc.) but I singled out Crash Into You for a couple of reasons, even though most of its themes aren’t quite so heavy as in the other books in the series. Firstly, because it’s my favourite book in the series – but more importantly, because Rachel (one of the book’s two protagonists) suffers from anxiety, which is something I’ve not come across often in my literary wanderings, and makes for a really interesting read.

Haruki Murakami//Norwegian Wood4) Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

What to say about Norwegian Wood? It’s a hard-hitter right from the beginning, with Toru narrating his childhood best friend’s suicide, and much of the book also deals with depression… it only gets darker as it goes on. Murakami’s slow, ponderous – almost hypnotic – writing style fits the tone of the novel perfectly, and had me caught up in its atmosphere for a long time after I’d finished reading.

Lionel Shriver//We Need to Talk about Kevin3) We Need to Talk about Kevin by Lionel Shriver

The story of a woman trying to raise a child who hates her, and is strongly implied to be a psychopath. Of course, Eva is an incredibly unreliable narrator, and her opinions colour everything in this book – which is written in the form of letters to her husband – but I think it still counts. 🙂

Jenn Bennett//Night Owls2) Night Owls by Jenn Bennett

The “tough topic” in this book came as something of a surprise to me when I first picked it up, but I thought it was incredibly well-integrated into the story. Really, this book is a cute romance between aspiring medical illustrator Beatrix, and notorious teenage graffiti artist Jack – but later on, there’s an important new character introduced, who suffers from schizophrenia.

Sally Green//Half Bad1) The Half Life trilogy by Sally Green

Okay, so I’ll admit that this is mostly at no. 1 because I’m currently getting close to the end of Half Lost, and am obsessed. In my defence, though, it’s a brilliant series, and seriously dark in places (by which I mean from beginning to end). Even when we’re first introduced to Nathan (the main character), he’s locked in a cage, and is being tortured on a regular basis… and it never seems to let up. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that he’ll get a happy ending, but I’m definitely not going to hold my breath.

[Top 5 Wednesday was created by gingerreadslainey. To find out more, or to join in, please check out the Goodreads group.]

2015 in Review: Favourites

Since we’re getting super, super-close to the end of the year, I thought it was about time that I shared some of my 2015 favourites with you! (That is, books I read in 2015, rather than books that were released in 2015… Though, as it turns out, a surprising number of these are actually new releases.) It takes a lot for me to pick a new book as an “official” favourite – by adding it to my favourites shelf on Goodreads – but there were five books that made the cut this year, and they are (in the order in which I read them):

Elizabeth Gaskell//North & SouthAll the way back in February, I read North & South by Elizabeth Gaskell, since I’d been watching (and loving) the 2004 mini-series with my cousin, but was too impatient to wait for her so we could finish the series together. Reading the book was, for me, a nice compromise that let me find out what was going to happen, without actually going ahead and watching the TV series on my own. This was also one of the 12 books that I wrote a full review for this year – you can read it here.

Jenn Bennett//Night OwlsE. Lockhart//The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-BanksIn the summer, I – like many people, I think – got really into contemporary fiction, and I ended up reading several very good ones. The two that really stood out to me, however, were The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart, which was a simultaneously really fun and really, really interesting boarding school story, full of pranks and social commentary; and Night Owls by Jenn Bennett, which was more of a pure romance novel, but with an unusual, arty premise.

Rainbow Rowell//Carry OnThe next book that really blew me away didn’t come along until October, but was, of course, Carry On by Rainbow Rowell! 😀 I’d been looking forward to this book for so long, and grabbed it as soon as I had the chance – and it didn’t disappoint, even a tiny bit. XD Everything about this book just made me ridiculously happy; I spent several weeks after (and during) reading it in a Carry On-induced happy daze, probably walking around with a ridiculous grin on my face the whole time. ^^’ (I also wrote a mini-review of this one, since I finished it during the Dewey’s 24-Hour Readathon.)

Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff//IlluminaeSo, if I had to pick an absolute favourite for the year, then that would probably be it… Or this book would be: Illuminae by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff came as a huge surprise to me. I’d heard a whole load of rave reviews, and I eventually picked it up because I was curious, but – since I am, emphatically, not a sci-fi fan – I wasn’t expecting to be hugely impressed. Needless to say, I was wrong. Illuminae was powerful, and ridiculously emotional; I even cried a bit, towards the end, which is something that hasn’t happened since I read The Book Thief last summer (and never before that, so far as I can remember). I’ll definitely be picking up the second book in this series as soon as it comes out next year!

The Bookish Alphabet Tag

This tag was created by Mariana at fireheartbooks, and I was tagged by the wonderful Loreva from La Book Dreamer, whose blog you should all definitely check out! The goal is to pick out a book for every letter of the alphabet, and the only rule is that you need to own (or to have previously owned and read) every book on the list. You also don’t need to include articles, e.g. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess would count for “C” rather than “A”.

So, without further ado:

MY BOOKISH ALPHABET

The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

Brightly Woven by Alexandra Bracken

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Daughter of Storms by Louise Cooper

Emma by Jane Austen

Fire by Kristin Cashore

The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey

Half Wild by Sally Green

The Iron Trial by Holly Black & Cassandra Clare

Just Listen by Sarah Dessen

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

Let It Snow by John Green, Lauren Myracle & Maureen Johnson

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

Night Owls by Jenn Bennett

Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder

Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas

River Daughter by Jane Hardstaff

A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin

A Traveller in Time by Alison Uttley

Unravel Me by Tahereh Mafi

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce

xxxHolic by CLAMP

Young Blood by Meg Cabot

Zombie-Loan by Peach-Pit

Phew. That was a lot of books! ^^’ But I’m pleased to say that I have read all of these books, and I still own them all except for Unravel Me, which I gave to one of my cousins, and River Daughter, which I donated (it was a good book, I just couldn’t imagine myself reading it again). And I did have to break out my manga collection for “X” and “Z” – something I’d been hoping I wouldn’t have to do – but I regret nothing. 😎

I tag:

 

August & September Haul

I didn’t post a book haul in August, not because I suddenly developed a modicum of self-control, but for the exact opposite reason: I bought so many books that I couldn’t bring myself to look at them all together and not feel a bit embarrassed. 😳 I am comforted, however, by the fact that I’ve already read almost all of these, so that’s something…

Anyway, I bought most of these in the lead-up to the Booktubeathon, after which I put myself on a strict book-buying ban – which I managed to keep to (mostly), even if I’ve taken myself off it now. 🙂 Here’s what I bought:

August & September Haul1) My Grandmother Sends Her Regards & Apologises by Fredrik Backman. I’d had my eye on this for a while, but what made me finally decide to buy it is the fact that it’s signed! I don’t really know what it’s about, except grandmothers, and possibly also superheroes.

2) Loveless, Volumes 11-12 by Yun Kouga. The latest two volumes in the Loveless series, which is about magic and murder and catboys, and is a lot of fun, though a little on the weird side. Fun fact: I read these not long after I bought them, and (somehow) only realised afterwards that I still haven’t read volume 9 or 10. 😳

3) Vampire Knight, Volume 11 by Matsuri Hino. The next volume I needed to read in the Vampire Knight series, which follows a girl whose duty is to keep the peace between the human and vampire students at her school.

4) Sinner by Maggie Stiefvater. The sequel to the Wolves of Mercy Falls books, which I read a couple of years ago and loved. I wanted to read this as soon as I realised it was going to be a thing, but I’ve been waiting for it to be released in paperback…

5) Victory of Eagles by Naomi Novik. The fifth book in the Temeraire series, which I mainly picked up because I spotted it in the edition that I’ve been trying to collect. The books have all been re-released recently with new covers, so it’s getting increasingly difficult to find these editions…

6) Bunny Drop, Volumes 1-2 by Yumi Unita. The beginning of the Bunny Drop series, which I finally decided to read after about the third time watching the anime. A really cute story about a man who ends up raising his grandfather’s illegitimate daughter.

7) Fables, the Deluxe Edition: Book 1 by Bill Willingham. I bought book 2 of this series sometime this summer, so I picked this up when I was in London, since it was on special offer, and I wanted to – if not complete, then at least fill in the gap in my collection.

8) Hark! A Vagrant by Kate Beaton. A collection of hilarious short comics from the webcomic of the same name. I bought this, and the next 3 books, using the Booktubeathon 100 books discount.

9) Nimona by Noelle Stevenson. A cute graphic novel about a supervillain and his sidekick, Nimona. I’d been on the fence about buying this for a while, but I’m really glad that I did!

10) In Real Life by Cory Doctorow & Jen Wang. Another cute graphic novel about a girl who plays MMORPGs.

11) Through the Woods by Emily Carroll. A collection of short horror stories in graphic novel format. Truly chilling – I will probably be re-reading this when Halloween rolls around. 🙂

12) Adventure Time Volume 1 by Ryan North. I picked this up at Oxfam since I enjoyed the Adventure Time with Fionna & Cake comic so much, but I will probably be library-ing the rest of the series… Still, a fun read, if you’re a fan of the Adventure Time cartoons.

13) The Princess & the Pony by Kate Beaton. I saw this on buy-one-get-one-half-price at Waterstones, and I couldn’t pass it up, even though I don’t usually read picture books. The tale of a warrior princess and her flatulent pony – by the same author as Hark! A Vagrant!

14) Night Owls by Jenn Bennett. A contemporary romance that I picked up on a whim, as the other half of that buy-one-get-one-half-price offer I just mentioned. And I’m super-glad that I did. This is probably one of my favourite books of the year so far. 😀 (Also called, in some places The Anatomical Shape of a Heart.)

15) Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas. The fourth book in the Throne of Glass series, which I picked up on release day because I’ve been so excited to read it for such a long time. It didn’t quite live up to my expectations, but it was still pretty good! And now, of course, I just need to read book five~ 😉

16) Amulet Volumes 1-3 by Kazu Kibuishi. A graphic novel series about a brother and sister who find a doorway to another world in their house. I’d heard a lot of good things about this series, so when the first three volumes showed up at Oxfam, it didn’t take much to convince me to buy them…

17) A Dark Horn Blowing by Dahlov Ipcar. Another one from Oxfam, though this one I’ve heard absolutely nothing about. It appears to be a fantasy novel, though, and sounds really, really intriguing. I hope to be reading this very soon.