Autumn Activities Book Tag

There’s really only a few weeks of autumn left this year, but it’s never too late for a fun tag, in my opinion! The Fall Activities Book Tag (which I have conveniently re-named) was originally created by Ashley from Dreaming Through Literature, and I was tagged by Ariana from The Quirky Book Nerd – be sure to check out her great answers to these prompts, too!

Leigh Bardugo//Crooked Kingdom1) Apple picking – a book on your TBR that looks so delicious you can’t wait to take a bite out of it.

There are a lot of books on my TBR at the moment that I’m really excited about, but the one I’m most eager for is undoubtedly Crooked Kingdom by Leigh BardugoSix of Crows was amazing, and I can’t wait to see where the story’s going to go next!

Andrzej Sapkowski//The Last Wish2) Corn maze – a book that’s fun to get lost in.

I could pick any number of books for this prompt (mostly fantasy), but among those is the series I’m currently working my way through: The Witcher series by Andrzej Sapkowski! So much is going on in these books that it’s a little difficult to follow at times, but it’s also incredibly engrossing, and I’m having a tonne of fun reading it. XD

Emily Carroll//Through the Woods3) Haunted house – a book that scared you silly.

I don’t read a lot of scary books (because I’m a bit of a wimp), but the graphic novel Through the Woods by Emily Carroll has some seriously creepy stories in it – including an actual haunted house! 😉 The art is wonderfully creepy, too, and it makes for a perfect Halloween read.

J.K. Rowling//Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets4) Pumpkin patch – the latest book you purchased.

The last book I picked up (for myself, at least) was the new illustrated edition of Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling, which is a thing of beauty. ❤ There don’t seem to be quite as many illustrations as in the first book, but what there is is really lovely.

Catherynne M. Valente//Deathless5) Scenic drive – a book that is beautifully written.

Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente is so beautifully written that it’s practically poetry; the way she phrases things is unusual, but in a way that gives her words incredible power. I’ve not read any of Valente’s other works yet, but I’m definitely looking forward to the day when I finally pick some of them up.

Holly Bourne//Soulmates6) Pumpkin carving – a book you wouldn’t mind carving up.

For a complete change of tone, I definitely wouldn’t mind chopping up Soulmates by Holly Bourne, and maybe tossing the pieces on a bonfire afterwards. I very rarely read a book and feel like I’ve wasted my time entirely (even with books that I didn’t enjoy), but this one was so bad that it actually made me angry.

Philip Reeve//Railhead7) Hiking – a book that was an enjoyable romp.

The word “romp” makes me think of adventures more than anything, so for this I decided to pick something a bit more lighthearted and fun, so… Railhead by Philip Reeve! This story didn’t stand still even for a moment, and I enjoyed it so much that it was difficult to put it down, even for necessary things like eating and sleeping. 😛 [Review.]

Tamora Pierce//Street Magic8) Apple cider – a book to curl up under the covers with.

My ultimate comfort read – as I’ve mentioned about a million times before – is Street Magic by Tamora Pierce (or anything by her, really, but Street Magic is my favourite), so that’s the book I turn to if I ever want to huddle up in bed for a whole day… if I’m ill, or just miserable – or cold, as the case may be. 😉 I also listen to the audiobook of it a lot, whenever I’m out and about and sick of music; it’s a wonderful production.

C.S. Lewis//The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe9) Jumping in leaves – a book that reminds you of your childhood.

The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis are hugely nostalgic for me. I remember first starting to read them when I was staying at my granny’s house for Christmas, and – once the holiday was over and I’d gone home – having to beg my parents for my own copies so that I could carry on reading. 😀

Bram Stoker//Dracula10) Scary movie night – your favourite spooky read.

As I said already, I’m not a huge fan of scary stories, but I did (finally) read Dracula by Bram Stoker earlier this year, and ended up really enjoying it. I wouldn’t say that I found it particularly spooky, but I reckon it still qualifies. 🙂 [Review.]

Becky Chambers//The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet11) Costume party – a book with an eclectic cast of characters.

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers has a wonderfully varied cast of characters, who are really the driving force behind this story. Every member of the Wayfarer‘s crew is fully developed and sympathetic, and has an interesting story to tell… a good thing, since – stuck on a trip through deep space – there’s not much going on plot-wise. [Review.]

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Thematic Recs: Wintery Books

Winter seems to have finally set in, and in true winter style, it’s dark by the time I finish work, and my whole family have come down with nasty colds. 😦 In celebration of the season, however, I thought I’d put together a list of some of my favourite Wintery reads. Which is to say, not necessarily books that are set during winter, but books that have that chilly, shivery quality to them, that makes you want to stay inside and huddle up by a warm fire, and just keep reading~! 😀

C.S. Lewis//The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe1) The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis. A winter classic! In this story, when the Pevensie children first visit Narnia, they find that it’s been cursed by the White Witch, so that it’s always winter, but never Christmas! Naturally, this is something that needs to be rectified. 😛

Maggie Stiefvater//Shiver2) The Wolves of Mercy Falls series by Maggie Stiefvater. An unusual werewolf story, where, instead of transforming on the full moon, Sam – one of the two main characters – and his pack become wolves whenever the weather gets too cold.

Paullina Simons//The Bronze Horseman3) The Bronze Horseman by Paullina Simons. For those of you who want something a bit more adult, I’d definitely recommend the first book in this amazing trilogy, which follows the life of a young Russian girl, Tatiana, and her lover Alexander, through the years of World War II, and, in particular, the Siege of Leningrad. This book mostly gave me the shivers because it’s so emotional and powerfully written, but a significant part of the book is also set during a very bleak winter.

Keith Austin//Snow, White4) Snow, White by Keith Austin. This book follows a young boy – John – who’s living in London when it’s hit by a freak snowstorm, and a pack of mysterious wolves is creeping steadily closer. A really great, atmospheric book, for slightly younger readers.

John Green, Lauren Myracle & Maureen Johnson//Let It Snow5) Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson & Lauren Myracle. And last up is something a bit more cheerful than the rest of the books on this list! Let It Snow is a collection of three (connected) short stories, all set in (and around) the same small town. My personal favourite was the last of the three (The Patron Saint of Pigs by Lauren Myracle), but they’re all really cute, and come together in the best possible way.

The Bookish Alphabet Tag

This tag was created by Mariana at fireheartbooks, and I was tagged by the wonderful Loreva from La Book Dreamer, whose blog you should all definitely check out! The goal is to pick out a book for every letter of the alphabet, and the only rule is that you need to own (or to have previously owned and read) every book on the list. You also don’t need to include articles, e.g. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess would count for “C” rather than “A”.

So, without further ado:

MY BOOKISH ALPHABET

The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

Brightly Woven by Alexandra Bracken

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Daughter of Storms by Louise Cooper

Emma by Jane Austen

Fire by Kristin Cashore

The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey

Half Wild by Sally Green

The Iron Trial by Holly Black & Cassandra Clare

Just Listen by Sarah Dessen

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

Let It Snow by John Green, Lauren Myracle & Maureen Johnson

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

Night Owls by Jenn Bennett

Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder

Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas

River Daughter by Jane Hardstaff

A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin

A Traveller in Time by Alison Uttley

Unravel Me by Tahereh Mafi

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce

xxxHolic by CLAMP

Young Blood by Meg Cabot

Zombie-Loan by Peach-Pit

Phew. That was a lot of books! ^^’ But I’m pleased to say that I have read all of these books, and I still own them all except for Unravel Me, which I gave to one of my cousins, and River Daughter, which I donated (it was a good book, I just couldn’t imagine myself reading it again). And I did have to break out my manga collection for “X” and “Z” – something I’d been hoping I wouldn’t have to do – but I regret nothing. 😎

I tag:

 

11 of the best books for children

The BBC recently came out with a list of the 11 greatest children’s books, as chosen by critics… And it’s an interesting article, but not one that I necessarily agreed with. For instance, I’m sure a lot of people remember Little Women fondly, but I personally found it unreadable when I was a child. And where are the Harry Potter books? So many people my age (myself included) only started reading for pleasure because of them, so surely that should earn them a place on the list! 😦

Anyway, I thought I’d try my hand at making my own list, as a counter to theirs, and I’d really love to hear what you consider to be the best children’s books, too! (And, for the record, when I think of children’s books, I think of the kind of books I would’ve been reading in primary school, so there won’t be any teen books on the list – though I know that, technically, they still count…)

Lemony Snicket//The Bad Beginning11) A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket

An incredibly creative series of books about a trio of orphans trying to solve the mystery of their parents’ deaths, whilst simultaneously being pursued by their distant cousin, the nefarious Count Olaf, who’s after their inheritance.

Dr. Seuss//Green Eggs & Ham10) Green Eggs & Ham by Dr. Seuss

A book that’s most famous for having been written using only 50 words, to settle a bet between Seuss and his publisher over whether it was possible to write a book with so few words. It’s a simple story about somebody who doesn’t like green eggs and ham.

Maurice Sendak//Where the Wild Things Are9) Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

The story of a boy who, after being sent to bed without supper, finds himself on an island inhabited by monsters, who make him their king. An amazingly-written book, with great, atmospheric illustrations, and themes of anger and growth.

J.R.R. Tolkien//The Hobbit8) The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

My favourite book as a child, this tells the story of an ordinary gentlehobbit called Bilbo Baggins, who is manipulated by the wizard Gandalf into going on an adventure with thirteen dwarves, in order to reclaim their homeland from a dragon. Probably one of the best pure adventure books ever written, though some people find Tolkien’s writing prosy.

David Almond//Heaven Eyes7) Heaven Eyes by David Almond

Skellig is the most critically-acclaimed of David Almond’s books, but my favourite has always been Heaven Eyes, which is about a group of friends who escape from their orphanage on a raft, only to find themselves stuck in a bog not too far down the river. They’re rescued by a strange girl called Heaven Eyes, who lives in the boggy island with her grandfather.

Roald Dahl//Matilda6) Matilda by Roald Dahl

Matilda is raised by her abusive parents and brother, and is constantly bullied by the awful Miss Trunchbull, the headteacher at her school. But through her own wits, she manages to forge a happy ending for herself and her friend, Miss Honey. A wonderful story about friendship and resourcefulness.

Dick King-Smith//A Mouse Called Wolf5) A Mouse Called Wolf by Dick King-Smith

There are a lot of Dick King-Smith books I could have chosen, but the one I remember most fondly is A Mouse Called Wolf, which follows the tiny Wolfgang Amadeus Mouse (named for Mozart, naturally), who has a great love for music, and becomes the world’s first singing mouse.

J.K. Rowling//Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone4) Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

This series really needs no introduction, as it’s famous worldwide, and for good reason! Reading about all Harry’s adventures is the best kind of escapism, and these books left millions of people wishing for their very own Hogwarts letters.

Antoine de Saint Exupéry//The Little Prince3) The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

A pilot stranded in the desert meets a prince from a small asteroid, who tells the tale of his travels on different planets, and the people he met on the way. This book is sombre, but incredibly touching, and all about childhood, and the strangeness of grown-ups.

C.S. Lewis//The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe2) The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

The tale of four siblings, evacuated to the countryside just before the second world war, who find another world by climbing into a wardrobe, and are tasked with saving Narnia from the White Witch. A great story about family, friendship, and loyalty.

Frances Hodgson Burnett//A Little Princess1) A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Sara is made to become a servant at her elite boarding school, after her father dies, leaving her with enormous debts to the school, but she is able to make the most of her situation, befriending the school’s other servant girl, as well as, and keeping her spirits up through imagination and storytelling.

Thematic Recs: Horses

Thematic Recs is back! It’s certainly been a while… 😳 I’m actually going pony trekking in Iceland tomorrow, which is super-exciting, but also means I’m not going to be able to reply to comments/etc. for a while (this, and the next couple of posts are all written in advance and scheduled). Anyway, since I’m getting back into horse-riding again, I thought I’d share with you some of my favourite horse-y books! 😀

K.M. Peyton//Flambards1) The Flambards series by K.M. Peyton. The story of a girl called Christina, who goes to live with her cousins in the countryside, because her uncle is hoping to use her inheritance to end their financial troubles. I read the first book, Flambards, as a set text in school, when I was 11, and I really loved it. The second book in the series (The Edge of the Cloud) isn’t really a horse book, but Christina does a lot of riding in the other three! (A lot of the people I’ve talked to aren’t too keen on this series, because it contains fox hunting, but I wouldn’t say that it’s a major theme – especially after the first book.)

Elizabeth Goudge//The Little White Horse2) The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge. Another story about a young orphaned girl going to live in the country with her cousin – this time the protagonist is thirteen-year-old Maria Merryweather – but that’s really where the similarities to Flambards end… When she gets to her cousin’s house, she finds out that there’s a curse on her family, which has caused significant damage to their relationships with one another. Throughout the story, Maria catches glimpses of an apparition of the little white horse from the title, and it plays an important role in her uncovering the secrets of Moonacre Manor. This book was made into a film in 2008, with the title The Secret of Moonacre, and the adaptation is also worth watching, though it’s quite different from the book.

Tamora Pierce//Wild Magic3) The Immortals quartet by Tamora Pierce. A four-book series that follows a girl called Daine, who has wild magic (which lets her talk to, transform into, and heal animals, as well as some other things that I’m probably forgetting…). When we first meet Daine, she’s travelling alone, except for her pony Cloud, who she introduces as both her best friend and her only remaining family. In general, Tamora Pierce writes her animal characters really well (and the Protector of the Small quartet in particular has some great horse characters), but of all of them, I think The Immortals is the most “horse-hearted”~ 😉

C.S. Lewis//The Horse and His Boy4) The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis. The third Chronicles of Narnia book, though it’s actually more of a companion novel, as the series’ main protagonists only make brief appearances. Instead, this book follows Shasta, an orphan who teams up with the talking Narnian horse, Bree, in order to escape from the land of Calormen. It’s set during the time-skip at the end of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, while the Pevensie siblings are all ruling Narnia as grown ups, and before they find their way back through the wardrobe to England.