#TomeTopple Readathon: Update 1 & Review

JUST FINISHED: Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. [529 pages]

From the 19th century Pacific to a distant, post-apocalyptic future, six people find themselves connected in an inexpressible way, as their stories ripple through time to impact the lives that they touch. Adam Ewing, an American lawyer, makes a perilous sea-voyage home; Robert Frobisher, a young composer, is hired as the assistant to an ageing genius; Luisa Rey, a journalist, uncovers a corporate conspiracy; Timothy Cavendish, a publisher, finds himself imprisoned in a retirement home against his will; Sonmi-451, a Fabricant, learns a horrifying truth about the society that engineered her; and Zachry, a goat-herd, is forced to share his home with a visitor from a technologically advanced tribe.

Reading this book has been the work of several years for me, so I doubt it’ll surprise anyone to learn that I really struggled with the beginning, partly because there were parts of Frobisher’s story that made me incredibly uncomfortable when I first started reading, and therefore have more to do with me than with the book, but also partly due to the way that the book is formatted – it starts with the first half of each of the first five stories, then the whole of the sixth, and then the ending to each of the first five, but in reverse order… For me, this meant that the first half of the book was rather a slog, as it felt like as soon as I was beginning to get invested in a storyline, it would abruptly cut off and move onto the next one.

And although even very early on we can see the stories begin to touch each other (i.e. Ewing’s journals are read by Frobisher, whose sextet is then heard by Luisa, and so on), it’s not until much later in the book that the true impact that these characters’ stories have had on each other’s lives becomes clear. Not to mention that, of course, I didn’t find all of the stories equally interesting; Sonmi’s was my favourite by a mile, but Zachry was difficult to connect with, and Timothy’s voice was outright annoying at times. However, while each of these stories would undoubtedly make decent standalone short stories, they are infinitely enhanced by the connections between them, and the way that the book as a whole was formatted made the revelation of those connections really impactful. By which I mean: it’s worth powering through. 😊

The theme of reincarnation, which is what initially sparked my interest in Cloud Atlas, is also threaded through the book, but is a much less important connection between characters than the physical form of their stories themselves (e.g. the journals).

In short, it’s a very clever book, and a very poignant one, and one that I suspect would probably improve further upon re-reading… which I may well do. If I start today, I might be finished by 2025! … Just kidding; six-year hiatuses aren’t my usual style, I promise. Though it definitely speaks to the power of Mitchell’s writing that I was able to jump back into the story without a hitch, even after all that time!

CURRENT READATHON STATUS: Done for the day, but glad to have finished my first tome (or at least the final 421 pages of it), and looking forward to starting on Eragon tomorrow.

Tomes Completed: 1
Pages Read: 421
Challenges Completed: 3/5

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