#BookTubeAThon2018: Update 3 & Review

JUST FINISHED: White Fang by Jack London.

White Fang tells the story of a wild wolf-dog, who is taken in by three human masters in turn, each of them with very different motivations. He is first a sled-dog, and then a fighter, then a sled-dog again, before finally getting a chance at an easier life, with a master who loves him.

This is an excellent story, as gut-wrenching as it is heart-warming, but it has a very slow start. It’s divided into five parts – the first following a two men being pursued across the snowy wastes by a hungry wolf pack; the second showing us White Fang’s puppyhood; and then a section with each of the wolf’s three owners (Grey Beaver, then Beauty Smith, and finally Weedon Scott) – the first of which is vaguely interesting, but entirely superfluous, and the second of which is even duller, but at least does the service of introducing the main character.

It gets better as it goes on, however, and the second half of the book is incredibly engaging. The heart of the story is in White Fang’s relationships with his three owners, and how he is shaped by each of them, whether through affection or through violence (of which there is a great deal). The very end of the book felt somewhat tacked-on, with a sudden flurry of action just as everything seemed to be winding down, and this part of the book could probably have been removed without really effecting the story at all – but the episode was only a few pages long, and the ending was otherwise appropriately sentimental.

Unsure of how closely they were connected, I made sure to read The Call of the Wild in preparation for this book, and although I would recommend reading them as a pair, it is certainly not necessary. The two books are thematically similar, and make a great accompaniment to one another (White Fang following a wild wolf who finds himself keeping company with humans, while The Call of the Wild is about a domestic dog who is, well, called to the wild), so it is clear why they are so often published in one volume, but there is no direct connection between them.

The film:
The adaptation I chose to watch (due to its easy availability more than anything else) was the Netflix animated film that was released earlier this year. I really liked the art style of this film, and appreciated that the filmmakers chose to leave out part one of the novel in its entirety, but felt that on the whole it was over-sanitised in a way that robbed the story of most of its emotional impact. The strength of White Fang is in the contrast between White Fang’s awful treatment at the hands of Beauty Smith (and, to a lesser extent, Gray Beaver) and his rehabilitation (so to speak) with Weedon Scott, and reducing the severity of the former also reduces the appreciation for the latter. I can see why this was done, as the gratuitous violence of the original story isn’t really appropriate for a children’s film, but it’s to the film’s detriment. This adaptation also changes the story a lot; it adds some structure, but most of these changes only seem to serve to make the book more politically correct… and the new ending tries its hand at heartwarming, but is significantly less so than in the original.

CURRENT BOOKTUBEATHON STATUS: Now onto my most anticipated book of the readathon, Bright We Burn! 💕🎶 Which was not included in my TBR, but would have been had I remembered that I was going to be going on a book shopping spree the day after writing it. 😅

Books Completed: 3
Pages Read: 1011
(+ Hours Listened: 4:12)
Challenges Completed: 6/7

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