#BookTubeAThon 2016: Update 2 & Mini-Review

Franny Billingsley//The Folk KeeperJUST FINISHED: The Folk Keeper by Franny Billingsley.

Corin Stonewall is a Folk Keeper; he protects the people in the orphanage where he lives, and the houses surrounding it, from the Folk – sinister creatures that sicken crops and livestock, rot food and play awful tricks on people if they’re not appeased with gifts and sacrifices. And Corin also has a secret: He’s not really Corin-the-Folk-Keeper, he’s Corinna, a girl who’s taught herself a few Folk Keepers’ tricks in order to gain some semblance of power over her own life. But when a dying man comes looking for her at the orphanage – asking for her by her real name! – and takes her away with him, all her carefully maintained layers of disguise are in danger of falling away.

While I can’t say that I loved this book, I did find it very interesting. Some good things: It was written in an eerie, haunting style that reminded me a bit of David Almond’s work (one of my favourite authors), which made it a very atmospheric read. There were also a couple of characters that I really liked, specifically Finian the lord who wants to be a sailor, and Taffy the deaf dog who so insistently tries to befriend Corinna. The transformation from Corin to Corinna was also quite remarkable, and I enjoyed how the completely separate entities that they initially seemed to be managed to gradually blend together – for such a short book, Corinna had some amazing character growth.

That said, I wasn’t a huge fan of Corinna for most of the first half of the book (she gave off some serious young Voldemort vibes), and was often so childish and petty that I had to consciously remind myself that, no, she wasn’t a petulant ten-year-old, but a teenager, and almost considered an adult in the story’s setting. Most of the book’s cast was unmemorable, and completely faded into the background – even the main villain! (The first few times he appeared, I kept muddling him up with one of the other characters who Corinna arbitrarily disliked.) And lastly, I would really like to have seen more of the Folk, who were made a prominent part of the setting, but weren’t much involved in the plot (beyond it’s premise).

In short: I did enjoy this book (mainly for its writing), but I probably wouldn’t read it again.3 stars

CURRENT READATHON STATUS: Sleepy… And I still need to pack! 😦

Books Completed: 2
Pages Read: 497
Challenges Completed: 1

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